“For isn’t it odd that the only language I have in which to speak of this crime is the language of the criminal who committed the crime? And what can that really mean? For the language of the criminal can contain only the goodness of the criminal’s deed. The language of the criminal can explain and express the deed only from the criminal’s point of view. It cannot contain the horror of the deed, the injustice of the deed, the agony, the humiliation inflicted on me. When I say to the criminal, “This is wrong, this is wrong, this is wrong,” or “This deed is bad, and this other deed is bad, and this one is also very, very bad,” the criminal understands the “wrong” in this way: It is wrong when “he” doesn’t get his fair share of profits from the crime just committed; he understands the word “bad” in this way: a fellow criminal betrayed a trust. That must be why, when I say, “I am filled with rage,” the criminal says, “But why?””
— Jamaica Kincaid (via kawrage)

JUN JUN JUN.

Remember listening to this shamelessly simplistic, ruthlessly heavy type of metalcore as a teenager and having to do it all secretively since it wasn’t up to snuff with the technical, Swedish, whatever metal I was into. (And was a whole different “scene.” So important, those teenage “scenes.”) Great to go back and enjoy as an adult, no-baggage–style.

flavorpill:

‘Petrochemical America’: The Richard Misrach Photos That Inspired ‘True Detective’

Oh my god, these photos.
Oh my god, the finale. flavorpill:

‘Petrochemical America’: The Richard Misrach Photos That Inspired ‘True Detective’

Oh my god, these photos.
Oh my god, the finale. flavorpill:

‘Petrochemical America’: The Richard Misrach Photos That Inspired ‘True Detective’

Oh my god, these photos.
Oh my god, the finale.

When things are nearby, they’re concrete and you can see the details of the things. On the other hand, when things are far away, they’re much more abstract. So thinking about things that are near and far puts us in different mental states. When you think about things nearby, you see the details, and so when a creative idea comes along, the first thing you ask is, can it work?

[But] most creative ideas are risky and the risks are obvious when you look at the details, so when you think about it with this detail-oriented mindset, you’re more likely to shoot the idea down. On the other hand, when you’re thinking about things that are far away, you’re in a more abstract frame of mind and so the first question you ask is not will this work; you’re more open to seeing the creative possibilities.

— NPR’s Shankar Vedantam highlights some curious research on why we miss creative ideas that are right under our noses, quite literally speaking. This is why the incubation stage of the creative process, where you step away from the problem at hand, is so important in producing the subsequent illumination stage. (via bookoisseur)

(via bookoisseur)

emilygould:

Last night after the No Regrets event I took the F home and there were two incredibly drunk guys in my car, middle-aged white guys in button-down shirts, not young fratty bros.  They were hugging a pole in the middle of the crowded car, talking to each other loudly, moving unsteadily, slurring their words. I was worried, like I am 50% of the time on the subway at night, that vomit might happen on or near me. But they were only bothering each other, til they started talking to a woman who was sitting in the outer seat of a two-seat facing them, effectively underneath them, such that to talk to her one of them had to put his hand on the metal pole right behind her head so that he was sort of crouching over her. She had big, obvious neon green headphones on and I couldn’t see her face because of the direction her seat was facing. And she had a book open, but they were talking to her anyway. I couldn’t hear anything she said. She laughed at one point but to me it sounded like an uncomfortable laugh. Everyone else in the car was looking at these guys, looking at her, looking at each other, saying nothing. And then the louder of the two guys I guess wanted to get her attention because maybe she went back to her book and stopped nervously appeasing him so he reached over and touched her shoulder, not hard, just like “hey,”

DON’T TOUCH HER, I screamed.

"Whuh? Hey, I’m just … mind your business, we’re just talking," or whatever nonsense, he slurred.

DON’T TOUCH WOMEN AND DON’T TALK TO THEM. YOU’RE DRUNK. SHE DOESN’T WANT TO TALK TO YOU. DON’T TOUCH WOMEN AND DON’T TALK TO THEM, I screamed.

He protested, he called me “McSweeney’s” (!!) and he called me some other names, including, of course, “crazy,”  But other women in the car chimed in, telling him to lay off, back off, calm down. And I got off at the next stop, so I don’t know what else happened.

This. Get it the fuck together, whitemales.

Today is Toni Morrison’s 83rd birthday. She’s the best I’ve ever read. Some fun ways of celebrating include watching this hourlong talk between her and Junot Díaz at the New York Public Library a couple months ago, and also reading Home, which was published in 2012 and is as masterful as all her other novels. And she wrote it in her freaking late 70s/early 80s.

Happy sixth birthday, PCB

popculturebrain:

…from one Tumblr vet to everyone out there, thank you so much for supporting me and making this thing that I do matter. I love entertainment and all that comes with it, so it’s been an incredible privilege to share my tastes and silly thoughts with such a passionate audience. Thank you also to everyone I’ve met and gotten to work with as a result of this thing, for shaping me as a professional social media, writer person. Now back to the regularly scheduled nonsense.

Alex does a fantastic job giving everyone something fun and interesting to scroll through, but he also provides a truly fundamental aggregation space for entertainment writers to sift through. His news judgment is impeccable and he’s a great guy and he goes to enough movies and Broadway shows to make us all jealous. Happy tumblrbirthday, man.

Louis C.K. was on Letterman last night and had some interesting things to say about the season three finale of Louie, that amazing episode filmed in China.

thupercollider:

that’s it. that’s the show.
thupercollider:

that’s it. that’s the show.

I’m a little behind. #GoT

Books of 2013

My 15 Favorites Read This Year (alphabetical by author):
Fun Home, Alison Bechdel [2006]
Open City, Teju Cole [2011]
The Unnamed, Joshua Ferris [2010]
Marbles, Ellen Forney [2012]
The Red House, Mark Haddon [2012]
Double Feature, Owen King [2013]
See Now Then, Jamaica Kincaid [2013]
How to Slowly Kill Yourself and Others in America, Kiese Laymon [2013]
Long Division, Kiese Laymon [2013]
The Twelve Tribes of Hattie, Ayana Mathis [2012]
Tar Baby, Toni Morrison [1981]
Archipelago, Monique Roffey [2012]
Ghana Must Go, Taiye Selasi [2013]
We the Animals, Justin Torres [2011]
Men We Reaped, Jesmyn Ward [2013]

Favorite Poetry Collection I Thought Was Just Amazing Tumblr-poetry Until It Arrived on My Doorstep as a Real Paper Book a Few Months Later:
salt., Nayyirah Waheed

Favorite Short Novel:
Master of Reality, John Darnelle (33 1/3 Series)

Favorite Service-y Book:
Daily Rituals: How Artists Work, Mason Currey

Audiobook That’s Might Be Better Than the Regular Version Award:
Mr. Penumbra’s 24-Hour Bookstore, Robin Sloan

The Book I Got from the Library and, Upon Finishing, Was So Mad I Didn’t Purchase:
Mortality, Christopher Hitchens

Favorite Comic by Brian K. Vaughan, the Guy Who Wrote Y: The Last Man, the Best Comic Ever:
Saga, which published its second trade paperback in July

Best Stephen King Novel of 2013:
Doctor Sleep, a 544-page sequel 36 years in the making

Best Stephen King Novel of 2013 (Very Close Runner-Up Edition):
Joyland, a 288-pager King probably tossed off one morning before lunch

Best Children’s Book to Listen to on the Week Yeezus Comes Out:
Beezus and Ramona, Beverly Cleary

Missed Margaret Atwood’s New One, But I Did Enjoy:
The Handmaid’s Tale as narrated by Claire Danes

Books That Inspired Recent Oscar Bait Which I Can Now Also Recommend as Great Reads:
The Descendants by Kaui Hart Hemmings, The Silver Linings Playbook by Matthew Quick

Best Stephen King Novels I Finally Checked Off in My Lifelong Quest:
Hearts in Atlantis, Dolores Claiborneboth seriously excellent. (Continuing to nag me from the shelves, meanwhile: The Tommyknockers, Dreamcatcher, The Regulators, Danse Macabre, The Bachman Books.)

Favorite Reread:
A Visit from the Goon Squad by Jennifer Egan

Favorite Music/Book Pairing of the Year:
Teju Cole’s Open City x Kendrick Lamar’s good kid, m.A.A.d city

Books I Now Know I Can Chuck If I Have to Make Space:
The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho, The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern, The Middlesteins by Jaime Attenberg and This Is Where I Leave You by Jonathan Tropper (although the last two are audiobooks — I’ll put ‘em on CDs and give put those out on my stoop, just to be symbolically consistent) [And I am not linking any of these books. I’m just not. Sorry.]

Coolest Interview I Got to Do About a Book I’ve Almost Completely Forgotten:
Elizabeth Strout, author of 2013’s The Burgess Boys and the 2009 Pulitzer winner, Olive Kitteridge

Favorite Bookish Interview I Got to Do in 2013:
Stephen King’s sons, Owen King and Joe Hill, simultaneously over Skype

Previous Favorites: 20122011

(and here I am on Goodreads)

Now: what were your favorites?

Jay dadsplains just like the rest of us.
[pics via Beyoncé] Jay dadsplains just like the rest of us.
[pics via Beyoncé]

Jay dadsplains just like the rest of us.

[pics via Beyoncé]

Watched House of Cards. Here’s how I feel about season two coming so soon.